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Issue 11, 2013
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Binding sugars: from natural lectins to synthetic receptors and engineered neolectins

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Abstract

The large diversity and complexity of glycan structures together with their crucial role in many biological or pathological processes require the development of new high-throughput techniques for analyses. Lectins are classically used for characterising, imaging or targeting glycoconjugates and, when printed on microarrays, they are very useful tools for profiling glycomes. Development of recombinant lectins gives access to reliable and reproducible material, while engineering of new binding sites on existing scaffolds allows tuning of specificity. From the accumulated knowledge on proteincarbohydrate interactions, it is now possible to use nucleotide and peptide (bio)synthesis for producing new carbohydrate-binding molecules. Such a biomimetic approach can also be addressed by boron chemistry and supra-molecular chemistry for the design of fully artificial glycosensors.

Graphical abstract: Binding sugars: from natural lectins to synthetic receptors and engineered neolectins

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Publication details

The article was received on 24 Oct 2012 and first published on 25 Jan 2013


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35435G
Citation: Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013,42, 4798-4813
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    Binding sugars: from natural lectins to synthetic receptors and engineered neolectins

    J. Arnaud, A. Audfray and A. Imberty, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 4798
    DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35435G

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