Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 7, 2012
Previous Article Next Article

Ring polymers as model bacterial chromosomes: confinement, chain topology, single chain statistics, and how they interact

Author affiliations

Abstract

Chromosomes in living cells are strongly confined but show a high level of spatial organization. Similarly, confined polymers display intriguing organizational and segregational properties. Here, we discuss how ring topology influences self-avoiding polymers confined in a cylindrical space, i.e. individual polymers as well as the way they interact. Our molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a ring polymer can be viewed as a “parallel connection” of two linear subchains, each trapped in a narrower imaginary tube. As a consequence, ring topology “stiffens” individual chains about fivefold and enhances their segregation appreciably, as if it induces extra linear ordering. Using a “renormalized” Flory approach, we show how ring topology influences individual chains in the long chain limit. Our polymer model quantitatively explains the long-standing observations of chromosome organization and segregation in E. coli.

Graphical abstract: Ring polymers as model bacterial chromosomes: confinement, chain topology, single chain statistics, and how they interact

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 19 Apr 2011, accepted on 30 Aug 2011 and first published on 03 Nov 2011


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C1SM05706E
Citation: Soft Matter, 2012,8, 2095-2102
  •   Request permissions

    Ring polymers as model bacterial chromosomes: confinement, chain topology, single chain statistics, and how they interact

    Y. Jung, C. Jeon, J. Kim, H. Jeong, S. Jun and B. Ha, Soft Matter, 2012, 8, 2095
    DOI: 10.1039/C1SM05706E

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements