Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 47, 2011
Previous Article Next Article

Synthetic inorganic materials by mimicking biomineralization processes using native and non-native protein functions

Author affiliations

Abstract

Nature is able to produce various inorganic structures with very specific fine structures in the micro- and nano-regime, which are facilitated and controlled by protein-based systems. Enzymes like silicateines catalyse biomineralization and provide organisms with exoskeletons with specific material properties. While these structures are interesting materials in biology, they also offer ample opportunities for material scientists to create man-made materials with the same biological species in a non-natural setting. While natural organisms rely on specific proteins for certain processes, other more accessible proteins show similar capabilities even though it is not their native function. Mimicking biomineralization provides a route for the formation of new materials of various shapes and compositions. In this article, synthetic processes and the resulting materials will be discussed, describing the tools and bio-inspired systems used and comparing the original biological function of the protein to its role in the non-natural process.

Graphical abstract: Synthetic inorganic materials by mimicking biomineralization processes using native and non-native protein functions

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 01 Jun 2011, accepted on 15 Sep 2011 and first published on 31 Oct 2011


Article type: Feature Article
DOI: 10.1039/C1JM12490K
Citation: J. Mater. Chem., 2011,21, 18903-18918
  •   Request permissions

    Synthetic inorganic materials by mimicking biomineralization processes using native and non-native protein functions

    A. Schulz, H. Wang, P. van Rijn and A. Böker, J. Mater. Chem., 2011, 21, 18903
    DOI: 10.1039/C1JM12490K

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements