Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 2, 2011
Previous Article Next Article

Design and development of quantum dots and other nanoparticles based cellular imaging probe

Author affiliations

Abstract

One goal of nanotechnology is to prepare cellular nanoprobes for various biological applications where conventional molecular probes fall short of long-term stability and simultaneous detection of multiple signals. Successful development of cellular nanoprobes requires the availability of a library of functional nanoparticles, knowledge of their interactions with cells and mechanism of cellular entry and to modulate these interactions by appropriate design of surface functionality. Although a great deal of research has been done in past 15 years, only limited success has been achieved in live cell labeling with high specificity, sub-cellular targeting and single molecule trafficking. This article focuses on the author's effort in making cellular imaging nanoprobes from different nanoparticles and discusses the most critical issues in the context of current knowledge, such as different variables that often influence labeling, non-specific binding/uptake of nanoprobes and specific live cell labeling. Finally, the important role of coating chemistry to overcome these problems has been highlighted and some successful labeling results have been summarized.

Graphical abstract: Design and development of quantum dots and other nanoparticles based cellular imaging probe

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 28 May 2010, accepted on 23 Sep 2010 and first published on 10 Nov 2010


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/C0CP00726A
Citation: Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011,13, 385-396
  •   Request permissions

    Design and development of quantum dots and other nanoparticles based cellular imaging probe

    N. R. Jana, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 385
    DOI: 10.1039/C0CP00726A

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements