Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 14, 2010
Previous Article Next Article

Engineering bicontinuous cubic structures at the nanoscale—the role of chain splay

Author affiliations

Abstract

Many amphiphilewater mixtures will self-assemble into three-dimensional soft condensed structures known as inverse bicontinuous cubic phases. These structures are found in nature and have applications in nanotechnology. Here we show that by systematically varying amphiphile chain splay, we are able to control the relative stability of the inverse bicontinuous phases in a homologous series of monoglycerides in a predictable manner. In particular, we demonstrate that decreasing chain splay leads to the appearance of the primitive bicontinuous cubic phase while increasing chain splay reduces the channel size of the remaining two bicontinuous phases and tends to destabilize them with respect to the more curved inverse micellar and inverse hexagonal phases. These observations are consistent with a model in which the energetic stability of these phases is principally governed by the competing demands for homogeneous interfacial curvature and uniform chain packing and points to straightforward rules for engineering these self-assembling nanostructures.

Graphical abstract: Engineering bicontinuous cubic structures at the nanoscale—the role of chain splay

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Publication details

The article was received on 07 Mar 2010, accepted on 04 May 2010 and first published on 26 May 2010


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C0SM00068J
Citation: Soft Matter, 2010,6, 3191-3194
  •   Request permissions

    Engineering bicontinuous cubic structures at the nanoscale—the role of chain splay

    C. V. Kulkarni, T. Tang, A. M. Seddon, J. M. Seddon, O. Ces and R. H. Templer, Soft Matter, 2010, 6, 3191
    DOI: 10.1039/C0SM00068J

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements