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Issue 9, 2008
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The nanopatterning of a stimulus-responsive polymer by thermal dip-pen nanolithography

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Abstract

We demonstrate that poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) nanostructures can be directly and reproducibly written from the melt using thermal dip-pen nanolithography. Whereas previous research examined polymer brushes where the strands were oriented normal to the surface, here the polymer strands are aligned parallel to the surface. Alignment parallel to the surface allows ultrathin films to be formed while still completely masking the substrate from the solution. Moreover, the aligned PNIPAAm retains its unique ability to reversibly bind and release proteins when driven through a hydrophobic–hydrophilic phase transition by a change in temperature. Unlike the conventional brush form, the phase transition in the aligned form is not associated with a change in height, retaining its dimensional stability.

Graphical abstract: The nanopatterning of a stimulus-responsive polymer by thermal dip-pen nanolithography

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Publication details

The article was received on 19 Mar 2008, accepted on 20 May 2008 and first published on 03 Jul 2008


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/B803599G
Citation: Soft Matter, 2008,4, 1844-1847
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    The nanopatterning of a stimulus-responsive polymer by thermal dip-pen nanolithography

    W. Lee, L. J. Whitman, J. Lee, W. P. King and P. E. Sheehan, Soft Matter, 2008, 4, 1844
    DOI: 10.1039/B803599G

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