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Issue 19, 2003
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Solid-state electroluminescent devices based on transition metal complexes

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Abstract

Transition metal complexes have emerged as promising candidates for applications in solid-state electroluminescent devices. These materials serve as multifunctional chromophores, into which electrons and holes can be injected, migrate and recombine to produce light emission. Their device characteristics are dominated by the presence of mobile ions that redistribute under an applied field and assist charge injection. As a result, an efficiency of 10 lm/W—among the highest efficiencies reported in a single layer electroluminescent device—was recently demonstrated. In this article we review the history of electroluminescence in transition metal complexes and discuss the issues that need to be addressed for these materials to succeed in display and lighting applications.

Graphical abstract: Solid-state electroluminescent devices based on transition metal complexes

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Publication details

The article was received on 17 Apr 2003, accepted on 03 Jun 2003 and first published on 17 Jul 2003


Article type: Feature Article
DOI: 10.1039/B304265K
Citation: Chem. Commun., 2003,0, 2392-2399
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    Solid-state electroluminescent devices based on transition metal complexes

    J. Slinker, D. Bernards, P. L. Houston, H. D. Abruña, S. Bernhard and G. G. Malliaras, Chem. Commun., 2003, 0, 2392
    DOI: 10.1039/B304265K

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