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Issue 18, 2013
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A comprehensive study of the crystallization mechanism involved in the nonaqueous formation of tungstite

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Abstract

We present a detailed study on the nonaqueous synthesis of tungstite nanostructures with the focus on crystallization processes and the evolution of particle morphology. Time-dependent transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed a complex, particle-based crystallization mechanism involving first the formation of spherical and single-crystalline primary particles of 2–8 nm, which are cross-linked to large and unordered agglomerates, followed by their organization into rod-like structures of 40 × 200–400 nm. These rods undergo an internal ordering process, during which crystallographically oriented stacks of platelets develop. In situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments confirm this pathway of particle formation. The scattering intensity is dominated by the fast formation of rod-like particles, which cause an inter-platelet peak in the SAXS pattern with ongoing internal ordering. With continuous reaction time, the platelet stacks start to fall apart forming shorter assemblies of just a few platelets or even single platelets.

Graphical abstract: A comprehensive study of the crystallization mechanism involved in the nonaqueous formation of tungstite

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Publication details

The article was received on 23 Apr 2013, accepted on 19 Jun 2013 and first published on 17 Jul 2013


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C3NR02020G
Citation: Nanoscale, 2013,5, 8517-8525
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    A comprehensive study of the crystallization mechanism involved in the nonaqueous formation of tungstite

    I. Olliges-Stadler, M. D. Rossell, M. J. Süess, B. Ludi, O. Bunk, J. S. Pedersen, H. Birkedal and M. Niederberger, Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 8517
    DOI: 10.1039/C3NR02020G

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