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Issue 14, 2004
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Sulfated polymers in biological mineralization: a plausible source for bio-inspired engineering

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Abstract

Biomineralization leads to the formation of inorganic crystals with unique, ordered, refined shapes that are regulated by specific macromolecules. This process has been a source of inspiration for exploring novel approaches to the fabrication of inorganic-based surfaces and interfaces. Among those macromolecules, sulfated polymers, referred to as proteoglycans, have not received enough attention, although there is increasing evidence of their widespread occurrence in biominerals. Here we examine the available information on the nature, distribution and possible role of sulfated polymers in biomineralization, and highlight new directions to stimulate further research activities.

Graphical abstract: Sulfated polymers in biological mineralization: a plausible source for bio-inspired engineering

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Publication details

The article was received on 29 Jan 2004, accepted on 07 May 2004 and first published on 15 Jun 2004


Article type: Feature Article
DOI: 10.1039/B401396D
Citation: J. Mater. Chem., 2004,14, 2154-2160
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    Sulfated polymers in biological mineralization: a plausible source for bio-inspired engineering

    J. L. Arias, A. Neira-Carrillo, J. I. Arias, C. Escobar, M. Bodero, M. David and M. S. Fernández, J. Mater. Chem., 2004, 14, 2154
    DOI: 10.1039/B401396D

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