Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 11, 2010
Previous Article Next Article

Elementary processes and limiting factors in hybrid polymer/nanoparticle solar cells

Author affiliations

Abstract

Semiconductor nanoparticles are promising for use as electron acceptors in polymer-based bulk heterojunction solar cells. Potential advantages over fullerene derivates that are widely used in organic photovoltaics are tuneable absorption properties and the possibility to use elongated nanoparticles for more efficient electron transport. Despite these advantages, efficiencies obtained with hybrid polymer/nanoparticle solar cells are still below those of state-of-the-art polymer/fullerene solar cells. This Perspective summarises the achievements in the field of hybrid solar cells, compares the knowledge on elementary processes in hybrid and organic systems and points out the most recent trends in research. The design of the polymer nanoparticle/interface by the choice of capping ligands and development of appropriate surface treatments for the nanoparticles plays an important role, and recent progress opens new perspectives for the future improvement of hybrid solar cells.

Graphical abstract: Elementary processes and limiting factors in hybrid polymer/nanoparticle solar cells

Back to tab navigation

Additions and corrections

Publication details

The article was received on 23 Jun 2010, accepted on 06 Aug 2010 and first published on 11 Oct 2010


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/C0EE00181C
Citation: Energy Environ. Sci., 2010,3, 1682-1694
  •   Request permissions

    Elementary processes and limiting factors in hybrid polymer/nanoparticle solar cells

    H. Borchert, Energy Environ. Sci., 2010, 3, 1682
    DOI: 10.1039/C0EE00181C

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements