Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 8, 2010
Previous Article Next Article

Recent advances in nanoelectrode architecture for photochemical hydrogen production

Author affiliations

Abstract

We review recent advances in nanoelectrode architecture for photochemical hydrogen production by water splitting. Today, solar energy is recognized as one of the most important renewable energy sources that humanity must harness in addressing the future energy sustainability issues. Of the different strategies for solar energy conversion, solar fuel or solar hydrogen conversion is attractive in that one can store the harvested energy in chemical bonds. Recent work in this field has focused on the use of nanoarchitecture designs that aim to increase photocatalytic activity, enable visible light harvesting, and ensure chemical stability and cost-effectiveness. In this perspective review, we focus on selected work in the following areas: (1) oxide semiconductor nanoelectrodes; (2) sensitization of semiconductor nanowire/nanotube arrays; (3) bioinorganic conjugate architectures; and (4) hybrid nanoarchitectures.

Graphical abstract: Recent advances in nanoelectrode architecture for photochemical hydrogen production

Back to tab navigation
Please wait while Download options loads

Publication details

The article was received on 21 Oct 2009, accepted on 25 May 2010 and first published on 15 Jun 2010


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/B922057G
Citation: Energy Environ. Sci., 2010,3, 1028-1036
  •   Request permissions

    Recent advances in nanoelectrode architecture for photochemical hydrogen production

    H. G. Park and J. K. Holt, Energy Environ. Sci., 2010, 3, 1028
    DOI: 10.1039/B922057G

Search articles by author