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Issue 38, 2012
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Amino–carboxylic recognition on surfaces: from 2D to 2D + 1 nano-architectures

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Abstract

The control of the electronic properties of the interfaces between small organic molecules and the substrate is key for the development of efficient and reliable organic-based devices. A promising and widely covered route is to interpose a Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM) to bridge the molecular film and the electrode. The morphology and the electronic level alignment of the triple substrate–SAM–organic layered system can be tuned by properly selecting the SAM composition. We have recently proposed a novel approach to the problem where, under ultra-high vacuum conditions, a molecular film is anchored to the SAM by exploiting the recognition between molecules functionalized, respectively, with −NH2 and −COOH end-groups. Here we briefly review the role of the amino–carboxylic interaction in the formation of ordered organic 2-dimensional architectures on solid surfaces. We then describe the anchoring process of carboxylic molecules on amine based SAMs we have recently reported on. New results are presented showing how multiple anchoring sites per molecule may be exploited for tailoring the molecular orientation as well as the density of the anchored molecules.

Graphical abstract: Amino–carboxylic recognition on surfaces: from 2D to 2D + 1 nano-architectures

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Publication details

The article was received on 30 May 2012, accepted on 08 Aug 2012 and first published on 08 Aug 2012


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/C2CP41790A
Citation: Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012,14, 13154-13162
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    Amino–carboxylic recognition on surfaces: from 2D to 2D + 1 nano-architectures

    A. Cossaro, D. Cvetko and L. Floreano, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 13154
    DOI: 10.1039/C2CP41790A

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