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Issue 20, 2005
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Burial of gas-phase HNO3 by growing ice surfaces under tropospheric conditions

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Abstract

The uptake of gas-phase nitric acid by ice surfaces undergoing growth by vapor deposition has been performed for the first time under conditions of the free troposphere. The investigation was performed using a coated-wall flow tube coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer, at nitric acid partial pressures between 10−7 and 10−6 hPa, at 214, 229 and 239 K. Ice surfaces were prepared as smooth ice films from ultra-pure water. During the experiments an excess flow of water vapor was added to the carrier gas flow and the existing ice surfaces grew by depositing water vapor. The average growth rates ranged from 0.7–5 μm min−1, values similar to those which prevail in some portions of the atmosphere. With growing ice the long term uptake of nitric acid is significantly enhanced compared to an experiment performed at equilibrium, i.e. at 100% relative humidity (RH) with respect to ice. The fraction of HNO3 that is deposited onto the growing ice surface is independent of the growth rate and may be driven by the solubility of the nitric acid in the growing ice film rather than by condensation kinetics alone.

Graphical abstract: Burial of gas-phase HNO3 by growing ice surfaces under tropospheric conditions

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Publication details

The article was received on 02 Jun 2004, accepted on 05 Aug 2004 and first published on 02 Sep 2005


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/B507797D
Citation: Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2005,7, 3596-3600
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    Burial of gas-phase HNO3 by growing ice surfaces under tropospheric conditions

    M. Ullerstam and J. P. D. Abbatt, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2005, 7, 3596
    DOI: 10.1039/B507797D

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