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Issue 1, 2004
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Synthetic hosts via molecular imprinting—are universal synthetic antibodies realistically possible?

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Abstract

Of the many ways to make synthetic hosts, one of the most appealing involves molecular imprinting. In the commonest approach monomer units assemble around or are attached to a template (imprint) molecule and then linked together using a cross-linking agent. Template removal ideally leaves cavities within the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) that possess a shape and functional group complementarity to the imprint molecule allowing its tight and selective uptake. This review highlights some recent advances in the synthesis of MIPs (often called “synthetic antibodies”) and enumerates a “wish list” of properties for the perfect MIP that may guide future studies.

Graphical abstract: Synthetic hosts via molecular imprinting—are universal synthetic antibodies realistically possible?

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Publication details

The article was received on 29 Apr 2003, accepted on 08 Jul 2003 and first published on 29 Jul 2003


Article type: Feature Article
DOI: 10.1039/B304720B
Citation: Chem. Commun., 2004, 5-14
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    Synthetic hosts via molecular imprinting—are universal synthetic antibodies realistically possible?

    S. C. Zimmerman and N. G. Lemcoff, Chem. Commun., 2004, 5
    DOI: 10.1039/B304720B

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