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Photoorganocatalysis, small organic molecules and light in the service of organic synthesis: the awakening of a sleeping giant

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Abstract

Photocatalysis, the use of light to promote organic transformations, is a field of catalysis that has received limited attention despite existing for over 100 years. With the revolution of photoredox catalysis in 2008, the rebirth or awakening of the field of photoorganocatalysis has brought new ideas and reactions to organic synthesis. This review will focus on the sudden outburst of literature regarding the use of small organic molecules as photocatalysts after 2013. In particular, it will focus on acridinium salts, benzophenones, pyrylium salts, thioxanthone derivatives, phenylglyoxylic acid, BODIPYs, flavin derivatives, and classes of organic molecules as catalysts for the photocatalytic generation of C–C and C–X bonds.

Graphical abstract: Photoorganocatalysis, small organic molecules and light in the service of organic synthesis: the awakening of a sleeping giant

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Publication details

The article was received on 26 Mar 2018, accepted on 29 May 2018 and first published on 29 May 2018


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/C8OB00725J
Citation: Org. Biomol. Chem., 2018, Advance Article
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    Photoorganocatalysis, small organic molecules and light in the service of organic synthesis: the awakening of a sleeping giant

    I. K. Sideri, E. Voutyritsa and C. G. Kokotos, Org. Biomol. Chem., 2018, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/C8OB00725J

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