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Maximizing the impact of microphysiological systems with in vitroin vivo translation

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Abstract

Microphysiological systems (MPS) hold promise for improving therapeutic drug approval rates by providing more physiological, human-based, in vitro assays for preclinical drug development activities compared to traditional in vitro and animal models. Here, we first summarize why MPSs are needed in pharmaceutical development, and examine how MPS technologies can be utilized to improve preclinical efforts. We then provide the perspective that the full impact of MPS technologies will be realized only when robust approaches for in vitroin vivo (MPS-to-human) translation are developed and utilized, and explain how the burgeoning field of quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP) can fill that need.

Graphical abstract: Maximizing the impact of microphysiological systems with in vitro–in vivo translation

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Publication details

The article was received on 14 Jan 2018, accepted on 12 May 2018 and first published on 04 Jun 2018


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/C8LC00039E
Citation: Lab Chip, 2018, Advance Article
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
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    Maximizing the impact of microphysiological systems with in vitroin vivo translation

    M. Cirit and C. L. Stokes, Lab Chip, 2018, Advance Article , DOI: 10.1039/C8LC00039E

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