Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 8, 2017
Previous Article Next Article

Synthesis of polyacid nanogels: pH-responsive sub-100 nm particles for functionalisation and fluorescent hydrogel assembly

Author affiliations

Abstract

Nanogels are crosslinked polymer particles with a swollen size between 1 and 100 nm. They are of major interest for advanced surface coatings, drug delivery, diagnostics and biomaterials. Synthesising polyacid nanogels that show triggered swelling using a scalable approach is a key objective of polymer colloid chemistry. Inspired by the ability of polar surfaces to enhance nanoparticle stabilisation, we report the first examples of pH-responsive polyacid nanogels containing high –COOH contents prepared by a simple, scalable, aqueous method. To demonstrate their functionalisation potential, glycidyl methacrylate was reacted with the –COOH chemical handles and the nanogels were converted to macro-crosslinkers. The concentrated (functionalised) nanogel dispersions retained their pH-responsiveness, were shear-thinning and formed physical gels at pH 7.4. The nanogels were covalently interlinked via free-radical coupling at 37 °C to form transparent, ductile, hydrogels. Mixing of the functionalised nanogels with polymer dots enabled covalent assembly of fluorescent hydrogels.

Graphical abstract: Synthesis of polyacid nanogels: pH-responsive sub-100 nm particles for functionalisation and fluorescent hydrogel assembly

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Publication details

The article was received on 05 Dec 2016, accepted on 19 Jan 2017 and first published on 25 Jan 2017


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C6SM02713J
Citation: Soft Matter, 2017,13, 1554-1560
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
  •   Request permissions

    Synthesis of polyacid nanogels: pH-responsive sub-100 nm particles for functionalisation and fluorescent hydrogel assembly

    A. H. Milani, J. M. Saunders, N. T. Nguyen, L. P. D. Ratcliffe, D. J. Adlam, A. J. Freemont, J. A. Hoyland, S. P. Armes and B. R. Saunders, Soft Matter, 2017, 13, 1554
    DOI: 10.1039/C6SM02713J

    This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material.

    Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

    • For reproduction of material from NJC:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
      [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
    • For reproduction of material from PPS:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

    Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements