Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 4, 2017
Previous Article Next Article

The next dimension of structural science communication: simple 3D printing directly from a crystal structure

Author affiliations

Abstract

Communicating science is hard. This is particularly true for a lot of structural science concepts which are inherently three dimensional in nature such as molecular geometry, symmetry, intermolecular interactions and the packing of crystal structures. One of the most effective ways to get around this difficulty is to use physical 3D models for communication, whether it is in an outreach setting, through classroom education or even presenting research results at a conference. Recent studies have shown how to generate instruction files to 3D print experimentally accurate models. Here we present for the first time how scientists can do this from any standard structural model file (incl. MOL2, XYZ, SDF, PDB, CIF, RES) easily using the well-known, freely available structure visualisation program, Mercury.

Graphical abstract: The next dimension of structural science communication: simple 3D printing directly from a crystal structure

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Publication details

The article was received on 18 Nov 2016, accepted on 26 Dec 2016 and first published on 26 Dec 2016


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C6CE02412B
Citation: CrystEngComm, 2017,19, 690-698
  •   Request permissions

    The next dimension of structural science communication: simple 3D printing directly from a crystal structure

    P. A. Wood, A. A. Sarjeant, I. J. Bruno, C. F. Macrae, H. E. Maynard-Casely and M. Towler, CrystEngComm, 2017, 19, 690
    DOI: 10.1039/C6CE02412B

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements