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Issue 7, 2016
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Durable and scalable icephobic surfaces: similarities and distinctions from superhydrophobic surfaces

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Abstract

Formation, adhesion, and accumulation of ice, snow, frost, glaze, rime, or their mixtures can cause severe problems for solar panels, wind turbines, aircrafts, heat pumps, power lines, telecommunication equipment, and submarines. These problems can decrease efficiency in power generation, increase energy consumption, result in mechanical and/or electrical failure, and generate safety hazards. To address these issues, the fundamentals of interfaces between liquids and surfaces at low temperatures have been extensively studied. This has lead to development of so called “icephobic” surfaces, which possess a number of overlapping, yet distinctive, characteristics from superhydrophobic surfaces. Less attention has been given to distinguishing differences between formation and adhesion of ice, snow, glaze, rime, and frost or to developing a clear definition for icephobic, or more correctly pagophobic, surfaces. In this review, we strive to clarify these differences and distinctions, while providing a comprehensive definition of icephobicity. We classify different canonical families of icephobic (pagophobic) surfaces providing a review of those with potential for scalable and robust development.

Graphical abstract: Durable and scalable icephobic surfaces: similarities and distinctions from superhydrophobic surfaces

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Publication details

The article was received on 10 Sep 2015, accepted on 30 Nov 2015 and first published on 30 Nov 2015


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5SM02295A
Citation: Soft Matter, 2016,12, 1938-1963
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
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    Durable and scalable icephobic surfaces: similarities and distinctions from superhydrophobic surfaces

    H. Sojoudi, M. Wang, N. D. Boscher, G. H. McKinley and K. K. Gleason, Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 1938
    DOI: 10.1039/C5SM02295A

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