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Issue 23, 2016
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Number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate: a transform theory for atomic force microscopy

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Abstract

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquids can measure a force curve between a probe and a buried substrate. The shape of the measured force curve is related to hydration structure on the substrate. However, until now, there has been no practical theory that can transform the force curve into the hydration structure, because treatment of the liquid confined between the probe and the substrate is a difficult problem. Here, we propose a robust and practical transform theory, which can generate the number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate from the force curve. As an example, we analyzed a force curve measured by using our high-resolution AFM with a newly fabricated ultrashort cantilever. It is demonstrated that the hydration structure on muscovite mica (001) surface can be reproduced from the force curve by using the transform theory. The transform theory will enhance AFM's ability and support structural analyses of solid/liquid interfaces. By using the transform theory, the effective diameter of a real probe apex is also obtained. This result will be important for designing a model probe of molecular scale simulations.

Graphical abstract: Number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate: a transform theory for atomic force microscopy

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Publication details

The article was received on 03 Feb 2016, accepted on 25 Mar 2016 and first published on 29 Mar 2016


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C6CP00769D
Citation: Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016,18, 15534-15544
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY-NC license
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    Number density distribution of solvent molecules on a substrate: a transform theory for atomic force microscopy

    K. Amano, Y. Liang, K. Miyazawa, K. Kobayashi, K. Hashimoto, K. Fukami, N. Nishi, T. Sakka, H. Onishi and T. Fukuma, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 15534
    DOI: 10.1039/C6CP00769D

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