Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 2, 2015
Previous Article Next Article

Antibiofouling polymer interfaces: poly(ethylene glycol) and other promising candidates

Author affiliations

Abstract

Nonspecific protein adsorption and/or microbial adsorption on biomedical materials adversely affects the efficacy of a range of biomedical systems, from implants and biosensors to nanoparticles. To address this problem, antibiofouling polymers can be coated on biomedical devices or built into nanoparticles to confer protein and/or microbial repellent properties. The current review provides an overview of the range of synthetic polymers currently used to this end and explores their biomedical potential. The most widely-used antifouling polymer, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is reviewed alongside several promising alternatives, including zwitterionic polymers, poly(hydroxyfunctional acrylates), poly(2-oxazoline)s, poly(vinylpyrrolidone), poly(glycerol), peptides and peptoids. For each material, notable applications for both nanomedicine and macroscopic surface coatings are highlighted.

Graphical abstract: Antibiofouling polymer interfaces: poly(ethylene glycol) and other promising candidates

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 02 Oct 2014, accepted on 22 Oct 2014 and first published on 04 Nov 2014


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4PY01356E
Author version
available:
Download author version (PDF)
Citation: Polym. Chem., 2015,6, 198-212
  •   Request permissions

    Antibiofouling polymer interfaces: poly(ethylene glycol) and other promising candidates

    S. Lowe, N. M. O'Brien-Simpson and L. A. Connal, Polym. Chem., 2015, 6, 198
    DOI: 10.1039/C4PY01356E

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements