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Issue 31, 2015
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Micromotors working in water through artificial aerobic metabolism

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Abstract

Most catalytic micro/nanomotors that have been developed so far use hydrogen peroxide as fuel, while some use hydrazine. These fuels are difficult to apply because they can cause skin irritation, and often form and store disruptive bubbles. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel catalytic Pt micromotor that does not produce bubbles, and is driven by the oxidation of stable, non-toxic primary alcohols and aldehydes with dissolved oxygen. This use of organic oxidation mirrors living systems, and lends this new motor essentially the same characteristics, including decreased motility in low oxygen environments and the direct isothermal conversion of chemical energy into mechanical energy. Interestingly, the motility direction is reversed by replacing the reducing fuels with hydrogen peroxide. Therefore, these micromotors not only provide a novel system in nanotechnology, but also help in further revealing the underlining mechanisms of motility of living organisms.

Graphical abstract: Micromotors working in water through artificial aerobic metabolism

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Publication details

The article was received on 19 May 2015, accepted on 01 Jul 2015 and first published on 07 Jul 2015


Article type: Communication
DOI: 10.1039/C5NR03300D
Citation: Nanoscale, 2015,7, 13186-13190
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
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    Micromotors working in water through artificial aerobic metabolism

    D. Yamamoto, T. Takada, M. Tachibana, Y. Iijima, A. Shioi and K. Yoshikawa, Nanoscale, 2015, 7, 13186
    DOI: 10.1039/C5NR03300D

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