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Issue 7, 2015
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Monolithic multilayer microfluidics via sacrificial molding of 3D-printed isomalt

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Abstract

Here we demonstrate a method for creating multilayer or 3D microfluidics by casting a curable resin around a water-soluble, freestanding sacrificial mold. We use a purpose-built 3D printer to pattern self-supporting filaments of the sugar alcohol isomalt, which we then back-fill with a transparent epoxy resin. Dissolving the sacrificial mold leaves a network of cylindrical channels as well as input and output ports. We use this technique to fabricate a combinatorial mixer capable of producing 8 combinations of two fluids in ratios ranging from 1 : 100 to 100 : 1. This approach allows rapid iteration on microfluidic chip design and enables the use of geometry and materials not accessible using conventional soft lithography. The ability to precisely pattern round channels in all three dimensions in hard and soft media may prove enabling for many organ-on-chip systems.

Graphical abstract: Monolithic multilayer microfluidics via sacrificial molding of 3D-printed isomalt

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Publication details

The article was received on 26 Nov 2014, accepted on 04 Feb 2015 and first published on 04 Feb 2015


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC01392A
Author version available: Download Author version (PDF)
Citation: Lab Chip, 2015,15, 1736-1741
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    Monolithic multilayer microfluidics via sacrificial molding of 3D-printed isomalt

    M. K. Gelber and R. Bhargava, Lab Chip, 2015, 15, 1736
    DOI: 10.1039/C4LC01392A

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