Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 1, 2015
Previous Article Next Article

Oleic acid content of a meal promotes oleoylethanolamide response and reduces subsequent energy intake in humans

Author affiliations

Abstract

Animal data suggest that dietary fat composition may influence endocannabinoid (EC) response and dietary behavior. This study tested the hypothesis that fatty acid composition of a meal can influence the short-term response of ECs and subsequent energy intake in humans. Fifteen volunteers on three occasions were randomly offered a meal containing 30 g of bread and 30 mL of one of three selected oils: sunflower oil (SO), high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO) and virgin olive oil (VOO). Plasma EC concentrations and appetite ratings over 2 h and energy intake over 24 h following the experimental meal were measured. Results showed that after HOSO and VOO consumption the circulating oleoylethanolamide (OEA) was significantly higher than after SO consumption; a concomitantly significant reduction of energy intake was found. For the first time the oleic acid content of a meal was demonstrated to increase the post-prandial response of circulating OEA and to reduce energy intake at subsequent meals in humans.

Graphical abstract: Oleic acid content of a meal promotes oleoylethanolamide response and reduces subsequent energy intake in humans

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 04 Aug 2014, accepted on 30 Sep 2014 and first published on 01 Oct 2014


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C4FO00697F
Author version available: Download Author version (PDF)
Citation: Food Funct., 2015,6, 203-209
  •   Request permissions

    Oleic acid content of a meal promotes oleoylethanolamide response and reduces subsequent energy intake in humans

    I. Mennella, M. Savarese, R. Ferracane, R. Sacchi and P. Vitaglione, Food Funct., 2015, 6, 203
    DOI: 10.1039/C4FO00697F

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements