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Issue 2, 2014
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Role of microscopic phase separation in gelation of aqueous gelatin solutions

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Abstract

Using a unique home-made cell for four-contact impedance spectroscopy of conductive liquid samples, we establish the existence of two low frequency conductivity relaxations in aqueous solutions of gelatin, in both liquid and gel states. A comparison with diffusion measurements using pulsed field gradient NMR, and circular dichroism spectroscopy, shows that the faster relaxation process is due to gelatin macromolecule self-diffusion. This single molecule diffusion is mostly insensitive to the macroscopic state of the sample, implying that we have a clear separation of gelatin molecules into a free and network-bound phase. Scaling relationships for the self-diffusion indicate that the gelation process is not a percolative phenomenon, but is caused by aggregation of triple helices into a system-spanning fibre network.

Graphical abstract: Role of microscopic phase separation in gelation of aqueous gelatin solutions

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Publication details

The article was received on 30 Sep 2013, accepted on 29 Oct 2013 and first published on 01 Nov 2013


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM52542B
Citation: Soft Matter, 2014,10, 348-356
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    Role of microscopic phase separation in gelation of aqueous gelatin solutions

    D. Pelc, S. Marion, M. Požek and M. Basletić, Soft Matter, 2014, 10, 348
    DOI: 10.1039/C3SM52542B

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