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Issue 5, 2014
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Spatiotemporal effects of a bioautocatalytic chemical wave revealed by time-resolved mass spectrometry

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Abstract

Mass spectrometry has been implemented as an on-line detection tool to monitor transmission of chemical signals due to natural processes such as diffusion and convection as well as a bienzymatic autocatalytic process. It was found that the enzyme-accelerated chemical wave propagates faster than the chemical wave propelled by other processes. The two enzymes (pyruvate kinase and adenylate kinase), involved in the process, work co-operatively catalysing production of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and induce formation of a front propagating along a high-aspect-ratio drift cell towards the ion source of an ion trap mass spectrometer. Isotopically labelled 13C-ATP was used as the trigger of the accelerated chemical wave. Using this substrate, one could easily distinguish between the two chemical waves (passive and accelerated) in a single experiment, reducing the bias due to the inherent experimental instabilities. We think that – following further improvements – the process described in this report may find applications in bioengineered systems, in which chemical signals need to be transmitted over macroscopic distances.

Graphical abstract: Spatiotemporal effects of a bioautocatalytic chemical wave revealed by time-resolved mass spectrometry

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Publication details

The article was received on 10 Jun 2013, accepted on 30 Oct 2013 and first published on 14 Nov 2013


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C3RA42873G
Citation: RSC Adv., 2014,4, 2103-2108
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    Spatiotemporal effects of a bioautocatalytic chemical wave revealed by time-resolved mass spectrometry

    H. Ting and P. L. Urban, RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 2103
    DOI: 10.1039/C3RA42873G

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