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Issue 12, 2014
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Solid-state nanopores and nanopore arrays optimized for optical detection

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Abstract

While conventional solid-state nanopore measurements utilize ionic current, there is a growing interest in alternative sensing paradigms, including optical detection. However, a limiting factor in the application of optical schemes in particular is the inherent background fluorescence created by the solid-state membrane itself, which can interfere with the desired signal and place restrictions on the fluorophores that can be employed. An ideal device would incorporate a localized reduction in membrane fluorescence using a method that can be integrated easily with the nanopore fabrication process. Here, we demonstrate that in addition to forming nanopores and nanopore arrays, a focused helium ion beam can be used to reduce the fluorescence of a conventional silicon nitride membrane controllably. The reduction in background produces low-fluorescence devices that can be used for optical detection of double-strand DNA, as well as for conventional resistive pulse sensing. This approach is used to identify the translocation of short single-strand DNA through individual nanopores within an array, creating potential for a massively-parallel detection scheme.

Graphical abstract: Solid-state nanopores and nanopore arrays optimized for optical detection

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Publication details

The article was received on 17 Jan 2014, accepted on 03 May 2014 and first published on 06 May 2014


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C4NR00305E
Citation: Nanoscale, 2014,6, 6991-6996
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    Solid-state nanopores and nanopore arrays optimized for optical detection

    F. Sawafta, B. Clancy, A. T. Carlsen, M. Huber and A. R. Hall, Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 6991
    DOI: 10.1039/C4NR00305E

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