Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 4, 2014
Previous Article Next Article

The emerging role of carbon isotope ratio determination in health research and medical diagnostics

Author affiliations

Abstract

Variations in the isotopic signature of carbon in biological samples (e.g. breath, blood and tissues) can be used to monitor shifts in whole body metabolism. As a conservative recorder of our diet, changes in the isotopic signature of carbon in biological samples provide an objective means to distinguish dietary patterns and the relationship with diseases. In addition, metabolic discrimination of carbon within the body can be informative regarding changes in the body's metabolic fuel usage during situations where shifts in the macronutrient oxidation ratio are expected. Therefore, changes in the isotopic signature over time have proven to be a tremendously powerful and sensitive means of detecting and measuring changes in steady-state systems. As such, this review focuses on how a naturally occurring ratio of stable isotopes of carbon (13C/12C) can be used as a biomarker for nutritional and metabolic status, altered macronutrient metabolism, and health and disease.

Graphical abstract: The emerging role of carbon isotope ratio determination in health research and medical diagnostics

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 01 Oct 2013, accepted on 21 Nov 2013 and first published on 22 Nov 2013


Article type: Tutorial Review
DOI: 10.1039/C3JA50327E
Citation: J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014,29, 594-598
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
  •   Request permissions

    The emerging role of carbon isotope ratio determination in health research and medical diagnostics

    D. E. Bütz, S. L. Casperson and L. D. Whigham, J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 594
    DOI: 10.1039/C3JA50327E

    This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Licence. Material from this article can be used in other publications provided that the correct acknowledgement is given with the reproduced material.

    Reproduced material should be attributed as follows:

    • For reproduction of material from NJC:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from PCCP:
      [Original citation] - Published by the PCCP Owner Societies.
    • For reproduction of material from PPS:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) on behalf of the European Society for Photobiology, the European Photochemistry Association, and RSC.
    • For reproduction of material from all other RSC journals:
      [Original citation] - Published by The Royal Society of Chemistry.

    Information about reproducing material from RSC articles with different licences is available on our Permission Requests page.

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements