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Issue 38, 2014
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Ultrafast charge separation and nongeminate electron–hole recombination in organic photovoltaics

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Abstract

The mechanism of electron–hole separation in organic solar cells is currently hotly debated. Recent experimental work suggests that these charges can separate on extremely short timescales (<100 fs). This can be understood in terms of delocalised transport within fullerene aggregates, which is thought to emerge on short timescales before vibronic relaxation induces polaron formation. However, in the optimal heterojunction morphology, electrons and holes will often re-encounter each other before reaching the electrodes. If such charges trap and cannot separate, then device efficiency will suffer. Here we extend the theory of ultrafast charge separation to incorporate polaron formation, and find that the same delocalised transport used to explain ultrafast charge separation can account for the suppression of nongeminate recombination in the best devices.

Graphical abstract: Ultrafast charge separation and nongeminate electron–hole recombination in organic photovoltaics

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Publication details

The article was received on 25 Apr 2014, accepted on 02 Jun 2014 and first published on 03 Jun 2014


Article type: Communication
DOI: 10.1039/C4CP01791A
Author version available: Download Author version (PDF)
Citation: Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014,16, 20305-20309
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    Ultrafast charge separation and nongeminate electron–hole recombination in organic photovoltaics

    S. L. Smith and A. W. Chin, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, 16, 20305
    DOI: 10.1039/C4CP01791A

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