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Issue 44, 2014
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Probing secondary interactions in biomolecular recognition by dynamic combinatorial chemistry

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Abstract

Artificial multivalent recognition systems offer promising perspectives for developing synthetic compounds capable of interacting effectively and selectively with biomolecules in aqueous medium. The identification of multi-point binding ligands requires screening of a large number of complex structures, with different spacers, different ligands, and varying valency. This represents a challenge for rational design approaches. On the other hand, the use of dynamic covalent chemistry enables a target-driven one-pot screening approach for probing secondary interactions, thereby facilitating the identification of multivalent recognition systems that optimally combine multiple fragments. Herein we review the recent developments in the implementation of dynamic combinatorial chemistry for probing secondary interactions and thereby identify multi-point binding ligands of biomolecules.

Graphical abstract: Probing secondary interactions in biomolecular recognition by dynamic combinatorial chemistry

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Publication details

The article was received on 12 Jan 2014, accepted on 13 Mar 2014 and first published on 28 Mar 2014


Article type: Feature Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4CC00263F
Citation: Chem. Commun., 2014,50, 5810-5825
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    Probing secondary interactions in biomolecular recognition by dynamic combinatorial chemistry

    S. Ulrich and P. Dumy, Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 5810
    DOI: 10.1039/C4CC00263F

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