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Issue 35, 2014
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Aerobic oxidation catalysis with stable radicals

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Abstract

Selective oxidation reactions are challenging when carried out on an industrial scale. Many traditional methods are undesirable from an environmental or safety point of view. There is a need to develop sustainable catalytic approaches that use molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant. This review will discuss the use of stable radicals (primarily nitroxyl radicals) in aerobic oxidation catalysis. We will discuss the important advances that have occurred in recent years, highlighting the catalytic performance, mechanistic insights and the expanding synthetic utility of these catalytic systems.

Graphical abstract: Aerobic oxidation catalysis with stable radicals

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Publication details

The article was received on 16 Sep 2013, accepted on 06 Mar 2014 and first published on 12 Mar 2014


Article type: Feature Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC47081D
Citation: Chem. Commun., 2014,50, 4524-4543
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
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    Aerobic oxidation catalysis with stable radicals

    Q. Cao, L. M. Dornan, L. Rogan, N. L. Hughes and M. J. Muldoon, Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 4524
    DOI: 10.1039/C3CC47081D

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