Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 3, 2013
Previous Article Next Article

Bioinspired self-cleaning surfaces with superhydrophobicity, superoleophobicity, and superhydrophilicity

Author affiliations

Abstract

Self-cleaning methods currently employed are based on understanding of the functions, structures, and principles of various objects found in living nature. Three types of surfaces, including superhydrophobic, superoleophobic, and superhydrophilic, offer solutions to keep a surface clean. In this review article, an overview of self-cleaning surfaces inspired by nine biological objects is provided: lotus leaves, rice leaves, cicada wings, butterfly wings, snail shell, fish scale, shark skin, pitcher plant, and photosynthesis. These surfaces exhibit special properties such as low adhesion, low drag, anisotropic wetting, anti-reflection, directional adhesion, anti-fouling, photocatalysis, self-sterilizing, and anti-fogging. We discuss the differences between the superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic surfaces and perspectives for self-cleaning surfaces in the future.

Graphical abstract: Bioinspired self-cleaning surfaces with superhydrophobicity, superoleophobicity, and superhydrophilicity

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 22 Jun 2012, accepted on 21 Oct 2012 and first published on 23 Oct 2012


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2RA21260A
Citation: RSC Adv., 2013,3, 671-690
  •   Request permissions

    Bioinspired self-cleaning surfaces with superhydrophobicity, superoleophobicity, and superhydrophilicity

    S. Nishimoto and B. Bhushan, RSC Adv., 2013, 3, 671
    DOI: 10.1039/C2RA21260A

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements