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Issue 30, 2013
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Passive fructose transporters in disease: a molecular overview of their structural specificity

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Abstract

The SLC2 family of facilitative Glucose transporters (Gluts) contains 14 isoforms divided into three classes based on amino acid sequence. While the majority of these proteins transport glucose, a subset can transport fructose. Recently, fructose and the Gluts responsible for fructose uptake have received increased interest due to the correlation between high fructose consumption and early onset of metabolic syndrome. In addition, the up-regulation of Gluts in certain cancers has made possible the development of a number of fructose probes for imaging cancer. Although structure activity data has defined some aspects of fructose-specific uptake, a far more detailed clarification of the variables governing the onset and progression of fructose-correlated diseases is still needed. Here, we summarize what is known about molecular structure and fructose uptake as it relates to the correlation of fructose and disease.

Graphical abstract: Passive fructose transporters in disease: a molecular overview of their structural specificity

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Publication details

The article was received on 22 Apr 2013, accepted on 10 Jun 2013 and first published on 20 Jun 2013


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/C3OB40805A
Citation: Org. Biomol. Chem., 2013,11, 4909-4920
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    Passive fructose transporters in disease: a molecular overview of their structural specificity

    D. T. McQuade, M. B. Plutschack and P. H. Seeberger, Org. Biomol. Chem., 2013, 11, 4909
    DOI: 10.1039/C3OB40805A

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