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Issue 8, 2013
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Microscopy and tunable resistive pulse sensing characterization of the swelling of pH-responsive, polymeric expansile nanoparticles

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Abstract

Polymeric expansile nanoparticles (eNPs) that respond to a mildly acidic environment by swelling with water and expanding 2–10× in diameter represent a new responsive drug delivery system. Here, we use a variety of techniques to characterize the pH- and time-dependence of eNP swelling as this is a key property responsible for the observed in vitro and in vivo performance of eNPs. Results demonstrate a significant change in eNP volume (>350×) at pH 5.0 as seen using: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (ff-TEM), fluorescence microscopy, and a new nanopore based characterization technology, the qNano, which measures both individual particle size as well as overall particle concentration in situ using tunable resistive pulse sensing. eNP swelling occurs in a continuous and yet heterogeneous manner over several days and is pH dependent.

Graphical abstract: Microscopy and tunable resistive pulse sensing characterization of the swelling of pH-responsive, polymeric expansile nanoparticles

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Publication details

The article was received on 07 Jan 2013, accepted on 26 Feb 2013 and first published on 05 Mar 2013


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C3NR00114H
Citation: Nanoscale, 2013,5, 3496-3504
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    Microscopy and tunable resistive pulse sensing characterization of the swelling of pH-responsive, polymeric expansile nanoparticles

    A. H. Colby, Y. L. Colson and M. W. Grinstaff, Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 3496
    DOI: 10.1039/C3NR00114H

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