Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 4, 2013
Previous Article Next Article

One-step polymer surface modification for minimizing drug, protein, and DNA adsorption in microanalytical systems

Author affiliations

Abstract

The non-specific adsorption of dissolved analytes strongly reduces the sensitivity and reliability in polymer microanalytical systems. Here, a one-step aqueous phase procedure modifies polymer material surfaces to strongly reduce their non-specific adsorption of a broad range of organic analytes including hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs (0.23 < ClogP < 8.95), small and large proteins (insulin, albumin, IgG), and DNA. The coating is shown to limit the adsorption of even highly hydrophobic drugs (ClogP > 8) in their pharmaceutically relevant concentration range ≤100 nM. The low adsorption is mediated by photochemical conjugation, where polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers in aqueous solution are covalently bound to the surface by UV illumination of dissolved benzophenone and a functionalized PEG. The method can coat the interior of polymer systems made from a range of materials commonly used in microanalytical systems, including polystyrene (PS), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), liquid crystalline polymer (LCP), and polyimide (PI).

Graphical abstract: One-step polymer surface modification for minimizing drug, protein, and DNA adsorption in microanalytical systems

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Publication details

The article was received on 02 Jul 2012, accepted on 27 Nov 2012 and first published on 20 Dec 2012


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40750G
Citation: Lab Chip, 2013,13, 669-675
  •   Request permissions

    One-step polymer surface modification for minimizing drug, protein, and DNA adsorption in microanalytical systems

    E. Kjær Unmack Larsen and N. B. Larsen, Lab Chip, 2013, 13, 669
    DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40750G

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements