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Issue 6, 2013
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The role of flow in green chemistry and engineering

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Abstract

Flow chemistry and continuous processing can offer many ways to make synthesis a more sustainable practice. These technologies help bridge the large gap between academic and industrial settings by often providing a more reproducible, scalable, safe and efficient option for performing chemical reactions. In this review, we use selected examples to demonstrate how continuous methods of synthesis can be greener than batch synthesis on a small and a large scale.

Graphical abstract: The role of flow in green chemistry and engineering

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Publication details

The article was received on 21 Feb 2013, accepted on 09 Apr 2013 and first published on 26 Apr 2013


Article type: Critical Review
DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40374B
Citation: Green Chem., 2013,15, 1456-1472
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
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    The role of flow in green chemistry and engineering

    S. G. Newman and K. F. Jensen, Green Chem., 2013, 15, 1456
    DOI: 10.1039/C3GC40374B

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