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Issue 12, 2013
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The composition and end-group functionality of sterically stabilized nanoparticles enhances the effectiveness of co-administered cytotoxins

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Abstract

Diffusion of active cytotoxic agents throughout an entire solid tumour is a particular challenge to successful drug delivery. Here we show the simple and robust generation of non-toxic, 10–15 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) that have been sterically stabilized by either 100% anionic or 100% cationic or 100% neutral end-functionalized steric stabilizers or by novel combinations of cationic and neutral end-functionalized polymer. When these nanoparticles were co-administered with various anti-cancer drugs, a significant increase in the diffusion and effectiveness of the cytotoxin in a 3-dimensional model of a solid tumour was shown for specific combinations of surface functionality and cytotoxin. The critical determinant of enhanced cytotoxin diffusion and effectiveness was the end functionality of the steric stabilizers and not the core composition (either iron oxide, silica or gold). We provide evidence that SPIONs stabilized with heterogeneous steric stabilizers enhance nuclear uptake of doxorubicin across multiple cell layers.

Graphical abstract: The composition and end-group functionality of sterically stabilized nanoparticles enhances the effectiveness of co-administered cytotoxins

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Publication details

The article was received on 10 May 2013, accepted on 02 Aug 2013 and first published on 13 Aug 2013


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C3BM60120J
Citation: Biomater. Sci., 2013,1, 1260-1272
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
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    The composition and end-group functionality of sterically stabilized nanoparticles enhances the effectiveness of co-administered cytotoxins

    N. S. Bryce, B. T. T. Pham, N. W. S. Fong, N. Jain, E. H. Pan, R. M. Whan, T. W. Hambley and B. S. Hawkett, Biomater. Sci., 2013, 1, 1260
    DOI: 10.1039/C3BM60120J

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