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Issue 23, 2013
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Whole organ cross-section chemical imaging using label-free mega-mosaic FTIR microscopy

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Abstract

FTIR chemical imaging has been demonstrated as a promising technique to construct automated systems to complement histopathological evaluation of biomedical tissue samples. The rapid chemical imaging of large areas of tissue has previously been a limiting factor in this application. Consequently, smaller areas of tissue have previously had to be sampled, possibly introducing sampling bias and potentially missing diagnostically important areas. In this report a high spatial resolution chemical image of a whole prostate cross section is shown comprising 66 million pixels. Each pixel represents an area 5.5 × 5.5 μm2 of tissue and contains a full infrared spectrum providing a chemical fingerprint. The data acquisition time was 14 hours, thus showing that a clinical time frame of hours rather than days has been achieved.

Graphical abstract: Whole organ cross-section chemical imaging using label-free mega-mosaic FTIR microscopy

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Publication details

The article was received on 04 Sep 2013, accepted on 02 Oct 2013 and first published on 02 Oct 2013


Article type: Communication
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01674A
Citation: Analyst, 2013,138, 7066-7069
  • Open access: Creative Commons BY license
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    Whole organ cross-section chemical imaging using label-free mega-mosaic FTIR microscopy

    P. Bassan, A. Sachdeva, J. H. Shanks, M. D. Brown, N. W. Clarke and P. Gardner, Analyst, 2013, 138, 7066
    DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01674A

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