Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 10, 2012
Previous Article Next Article

Screening and designing patchy particles for optimized self-assembly propensity through assembly pathway engineering

Author affiliations

Abstract

Self-assembly holds promise for creating new materials and devices because of its inherent parallelism, allowing many building blocks to simultaneously organize using preprogrammed interactions. An important trend in nanoparticle and colloid science is the synthesis of particles with unusual shapes and/or directional (“patchy”) interactions, whose anisotropy allows, in principle, assemblies of unprecedented complexity. However, patchy particles are more prone to long relaxation times during thermodynamically driven assembly, and there is no a priori way of predicting which particles might be good assembly candidates. Here we demonstrate a new conceptual approach to predict this information using sequences of intermediate clusters that appear during assembly. We demonstrate our approach on a family of model building blocks as well as a real system of CdTe/CdS tetrahedra and find design rules for engineering the optimized assembly of target structures.

Graphical abstract: Screening and designing patchy particles for optimized self-assembly propensity through assembly pathway engineering

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 03 Nov 2011, accepted on 06 Jan 2012 and first published on 02 Feb 2012


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C2SM07101K
Citation: Soft Matter, 2012,8, 2852-2859
  •   Request permissions

    Screening and designing patchy particles for optimized self-assembly propensity through assembly pathway engineering

    E. Jankowski and S. C. Glotzer, Soft Matter, 2012, 8, 2852
    DOI: 10.1039/C2SM07101K

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements