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Issue 1, 2012
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Self-assembled amino acids and dipeptides as noncovalent hydrogels for tissue engineering

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Abstract

Noncovalent hydrogels derived from the self-assembly of peptides and proteins have demonstrated advantages over covalent hydrogels for three-dimensional cell scaffolding applications. There is growing interest in exploiting minimal, self-assembling dipeptides and amino acids as hydrogel networks that support cell culture applications, but significant questions persist concerning the mechanism of self-assembly and the relationship between the molecular structure of the assembled materials and their emergent viscoelastic and biochemical properties. This review will critically assess current progress in the use of minimal self-assembling peptides and functionalized amino acids to create hydrogels, with a focus on the challenges of understanding the structure and function of these materials and on the outlook for the use of these modular and dynamic materials as robust networks for tissue engineering.

Graphical abstract: Self-assembled amino acids and dipeptides as noncovalent hydrogels for tissue engineering

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Publication details

The article was received on 26 Jul 2011, accepted on 16 Sep 2011 and first published on 07 Oct 2011


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00335F
Citation: Polym. Chem., 2012,3, 18-33
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    Self-assembled amino acids and dipeptides as noncovalent hydrogels for tissue engineering

    D. M. Ryan and B. L. Nilsson, Polym. Chem., 2012, 3, 18
    DOI: 10.1039/C1PY00335F

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