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Issue 1, 2012
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UV wavelength-dependent DNA damage and human non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer

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Abstract

Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation from the sun has been epidemiologically and mechanistically linked to skin cancer, a spectrum of diseases of rising incidence in many human populations. Both non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers are associated with sunlight exposure. In this review, we discuss the UV wavelength-dependent formation of the major UV-induced DNA damage products, their repair and mutagenicity and their potential involvement in sunlight-associated skin cancers. We emphasize the major role played by the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in skin cancer mutations relative to that of (6–4) photoproducts and oxidative DNA damage. Collectively, the data implicate the CPD as the DNA lesion most strongly involved in human cancers induced by sunlight.

Graphical abstract: UV wavelength-dependent DNA damage and human non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer

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Publication details

The article was received on 13 May 2011, accepted on 23 Jun 2011 and first published on 01 Aug 2011


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/C1PP05144J
Citation: Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2012,11, 90-97
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    UV wavelength-dependent DNA damage and human non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer

    G. P. Pfeifer and A. Besaratinia, Photochem. Photobiol. Sci., 2012, 11, 90
    DOI: 10.1039/C1PP05144J

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