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Issue 7, 2012
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Single-layer graphene sound-emitting devices: experiments and modeling

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Abstract

Single-layer graphene (SLG) was demonstrated to emit sound. The sound emission from SLG had a significant flat frequency response in the wide ultrasound range from 20 kHz to 50 kHz. SLG can produce a sound pressure level (SPL) as high as 95 dB at a distance of 5 cm with a sound frequency of 20 kHz. The SPL value is among the highest reported to date for sound-emitting devices (SEDs) based on the thermoacoustic effect. A theoretical model was established to analyze the sound emission from SLG. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental results. Conventional acoustic devices with a large size can be reduced to the nano-scale by using this novel SLG-SED material. It has the potential to be widely used in speakers, buzzers, earphones, ultrasonic transducer, etc.

Graphical abstract: Single-layer graphene sound-emitting devices: experiments and modeling

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Publication details

The article was received on 24 Oct 2011, accepted on 26 Nov 2011 and first published on 03 Jan 2012


Article type: Communication
DOI: 10.1039/C2NR11572G
Citation: Nanoscale, 2012,4, 2272-2277
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    Single-layer graphene sound-emitting devices: experiments and modeling

    H. Tian, D. Xie, Y. Yang, T. Ren, Y. Wang, C. Zhou, P. Peng, L. Wang and L. Liu, Nanoscale, 2012, 4, 2272
    DOI: 10.1039/C2NR11572G

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