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Issue 10, 2012
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Combining redox-proteomics and epigenomics to explain the involvement of oxidative stress in psychiatric disorders

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Abstract

Psychiatric disorders affect approximately 10% of adults in North-America. The complex nature of these illnesses makes the search for their pathophysiology a challenge. However, studies have consistently shown that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are common features across major psychiatric disorders, including bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Nevertheless, little is known about specific targets of oxidation in the brain. The search for redox sensors (protein targets for oxidation) will offer information about which pathways are regulated by oxidation in psychiatric disorders. Additionally, DNA is also a target for oxidative damage and recently, studies have suggested that oxidation of cytosine and guanosine can serve as an epigenetic modulator by decreasing or preventing further DNA methylation. Therefore, this review aims to discuss how we can use redox-proteomics and epigenomics to help explain the role of oxidative damage in major psychiatric disorders, which may ultimately lead to the identification of targets for development of new medications.

Graphical abstract: Combining redox-proteomics and epigenomics to explain the involvement of oxidative stress in psychiatric disorders

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Publication details

The article was received on 27 Mar 2012, accepted on 10 May 2012 and first published on 18 Jun 2012


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2MB25118C
Citation: Mol. BioSyst., 2012,8, 2503-2512
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    Combining redox-proteomics and epigenomics to explain the involvement of oxidative stress in psychiatric disorders

    A. C. Andreazza, Mol. BioSyst., 2012, 8, 2503
    DOI: 10.1039/C2MB25118C

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