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Volume 155, 2012
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Electron transfer kinetics in water splitting dye-sensitized solar cells based on core–shell oxide electrodes

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Abstract

Photoelectrochemical water splitting occurs in a dye-sensitized solar cell when a [Ru(bpy)3]2+-based dye covalently links a porous TiO2 anode film to IrO2·nH2O nanoparticles. The quantum yield for oxygen evolution is low because of rapid back electron transfer between TiO2 and the oxidized dye, which occurs on a timescale of hundreds of microseconds, When iodide is added as an electron donor, the photocurrent increases, confirming that the initial charge injection efficiency is high. When the porous TiO2 film is coated with a 1–2 nm thick layer of ZrO2 or Nb2O5, both the charge injection rate and back electron transfer rate decrease. The efficiency of the cell increases and then decreases with increasing film thickness, consistent with the trends in charge injection and recombination rates. The current efficiency for oxygen evolution, measured electrochemically in a generator-collector geometry, is close to 100%. The factors that lead to polarization of the photoanode and possible ways to re-design the system for higher efficiency are discussed.

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Publication details

The article was received on 26 Apr 2011, accepted on 10 Jun 2011 and first published on 06 Jul 2011


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00083G
Citation: Faraday Discuss., 2012,155, 165-176
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    Electron transfer kinetics in water splitting dye-sensitized solar cells based on core–shell oxide electrodes

    S. A. Lee, Y. Zhao, E. A. Hernandez-Pagan, L. Blasdel, W. J. Youngblood and T. E. Mallouk, Faraday Discuss., 2012, 155, 165
    DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00083G

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