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Issue 19, 2012
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Laboratory studies of photochemistry and gas phase radical reaction kinetics relevant to planetary atmospheres

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Abstract

This review seeks to bring together a selection of recent laboratory work on gas phase photochemistry, kinetics and reaction dynamics of radical species relevant to the understanding of planetary atmospheres other than that of Earth. A majority of work focuses on the rich organic chemistry associated with photochemically initiated reactions in the upper atmospheres of the giant planets. Reactions relevant to Titan, the largest moon of Saturn and with a nitrogen/methane dominated atmosphere, have also received much focus due to potential to explain the chemistry of Earth's prebiotic atmosphere. Analogies are drawn between the approaches of terrestrial and non-terrestrial atmospheric chemistry.

Graphical abstract: Laboratory studies of photochemistry and gas phase radical reaction kinetics relevant to planetary atmospheres

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Publication details

The article was received on 06 Jun 2012 and first published on 09 Aug 2012


Article type: Critical Review
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35204D
Citation: Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012,41, 6318-6347
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    Laboratory studies of photochemistry and gas phase radical reaction kinetics relevant to planetary atmospheres

    M. A. Blitz and P. W. Seakins, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012, 41, 6318
    DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35204D

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