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Issue 16, 2012
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Mineral–organic interfacial processes: potential roles in the origins of life

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Abstract

Life is believed to have originated on Earth ∼4.4–3.5 Ga ago, via processes in which organic compounds supplied by the environment self-organized, in some geochemical environmental niches, into systems capable of replication with hereditary mutation. This process is generally supposed to have occurred in an aqueous environment and, likely, in the presence of minerals. Mineral surfaces present rich opportunities for heterogeneous catalysis and concentration which may have significantly altered and directed the process of prebiotic organic complexification leading to life. We review here general concepts in prebiotic mineral-organic interfacial processes, as well as recent advances in the study of mineral surface-organic interactions of potential relevance to understanding the origin of life.

Graphical abstract: Mineral–organic interfacial processes: potential roles in the origins of life

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Publication details

The article was received on 02 Apr 2012 and first published on 28 Jun 2012


Article type: Critical Review
DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35112A
Citation: Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012,41, 5502-5525
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    Mineral–organic interfacial processes: potential roles in the origins of life

    H. James Cleaves II, A. Michalkova Scott, F. C. Hill, J. Leszczynski, N. Sahai and R. Hazen, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012, 41, 5502
    DOI: 10.1039/C2CS35112A

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