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Issue 12, 2011
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Origin of the superior adhesive performance of mushroom-shaped microstructured surfaces

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Abstract

The superlative adhesive properties of some biological attachment systems, such as those of geckos, spiders, and insects, have inspired researchers from different fields (e.g. biology, physics and engineering) to conceive and design man-made microstructured surfaces that might mimic their performance. Among the several proposed designs, very recently mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructures have drawn the interest of scientists and engineers, because experiments have proved their superiority compared to other micro- and nano-structures. In this article, we explain theoretically the physical mechanism behind the enhanced adhesion of such microstructures, and provide for the first time a useful tool to predict adhesive performance depending on the geometry, mechanical properties of the material, and energy of adhesion. Our theoretical predictions are strongly supported by the available experimental data. The present study can streamline the optimisation of adhesive microstructures for industrial applications.

Graphical abstract: Origin of the superior adhesive performance of mushroom-shaped microstructured surfaces

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Publication details

The article was received on 13 Dec 2010, accepted on 09 Feb 2011 and first published on 08 Mar 2011


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C0SM01482F
Citation: Soft Matter, 2011,7, 5545-5552
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    Origin of the superior adhesive performance of mushroom-shaped microstructured surfaces

    G. Carbone, E. Pierro and S. N. Gorb, Soft Matter, 2011, 7, 5545
    DOI: 10.1039/C0SM01482F

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