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Issue 2, 2011
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Miniaturized ionization gas sensors from single metal oxide nanowires

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Abstract

Gas detection experiments were performed with individual tin dioxide (SnO2) nanowires specifically configured to observe surface ion (SI) emission response towards representative analyte species. These devices were found to work at much lower temperatures (T ≈ 280 °C) and bias voltages (V ≈ 2 V) than their micro-counterparts, thereby demonstrating the inherent potential of individual nanostructures in building functional nanodevices. High selectivity of our miniaturized sensors emerges from the dissimilar sensing mechanisms of those typical of standard resistive-type sensors (RES). Therefore, by employing this detection principle (SI) together with RES measurements, better selectivity than that observed in standard metal oxide sensors could be demonstrated. Simplicity and specificity of the gas detection as well as low-power consumption make these single nanowire devices promising technological alternatives to overcome the major drawbacks of solid-state sensor technologies.

Graphical abstract: Miniaturized ionization gas sensors from single metal oxide nanowires

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Publication details

The article was received on 21 Jul 2010, accepted on 21 Sep 2010 and first published on 16 Nov 2010


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00528B
Citation: Nanoscale, 2011,3, 630-634
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    Miniaturized ionization gas sensors from single metal oxide nanowires

    F. Hernandez-Ramirez, J. D. Prades, A. Hackner, T. Fischer, G. Mueller, S. Mathur and J. R. Morante, Nanoscale, 2011, 3, 630
    DOI: 10.1039/C0NR00528B

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