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Issue 3, 2011
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Tapping the near-infrared spectral region with bacteriochlorin arrays

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Abstract

Bacteriochlorophylls—natural pigments for absorption of near-infrared (NIR) light—underlie light-absorption and energy transduction in photosynthetic bacteria. Capturing and utilizing NIR light is valuable in fields ranging from artificial photosynthesis to photomedicine (photodynamic therapy, imaging, and diagnostics). The desired photochemical features may be best elicited with multicomponent architectures that support efficient excited-state energy and/or electron transfer, yet few such arrays containing bacteriochlorins (the core chromophore of bacteriochlorophylls) are known. This review outlines three synthetic approaches toward bacteriochlorins, surveys all known bacteriochlorin arrays, and compares molecular design strategies for light-harvesting arrays containing bacteriochlorinsversus (the better known) porphyrins.

Graphical abstract: Tapping the near-infrared spectral region with bacteriochlorin arrays

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Publication details

The article was received on 12 Dec 2010, accepted on 26 Jan 2011 and first published on 15 Feb 2011


Article type: Focus
DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00977F
Citation: New J. Chem., 2011,35, 511-516
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    Tapping the near-infrared spectral region with bacteriochlorin arrays

    J. S. Lindsey, O. Mass and C. Chen, New J. Chem., 2011, 35, 511
    DOI: 10.1039/C0NJ00977F

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