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Issue 10, 2011
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Disorders associated with systemic or local iron overload: from pathophysiology to clinical practice

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Abstract

In healthy subjects, the rate of dietary iron absorption, as well as the amount and distribution of body iron are tightly controlled by hepcidin, the iron regulatory hormone. Disruption of systemic iron homeostasis leads to pathological conditions, ranging from anemias caused by iron deficiency or defective iron traffic, to iron overload (hemochromatosis). Other iron-related disorders are caused by misregulation of cellular iron metabolism, which results in local accumulation of the metal in mitochondria. Brain iron overload is observed in neurodegenerative disorders. Secondary hemochromatosis develops as a complication of another disease. For example, repeated blood transfusions, a standard treatment of various anemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis, promote transfusional siderosis, while chronic liver diseases are often associated with mild to moderate secondary iron overload. In this critical review, we discuss pathophysiological and clinical aspects of all types of iron metabolism disorders (265 references).

Graphical abstract: Disorders associated with systemic or local iron overload: from pathophysiology to clinical practice

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Publication details

The article was received on 05 Jul 2011, accepted on 16 Aug 2011 and first published on 07 Sep 2011


Article type: Critical Review
DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00082A
Citation: Metallomics, 2011,3, 971-986
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    Disorders associated with systemic or local iron overload: from pathophysiology to clinical practice

    G. Sebastiani and K. Pantopoulos, Metallomics, 2011, 3, 971
    DOI: 10.1039/C1MT00082A

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